Psalm 50:1

Psalm 50:1

February 06, 2020 – Thursday

Psalm 50:1  NKJV

The Mighty One, God the Lord, Has spoken and called the earth From the rising of the sun to its going down.

Psalm 50:1  ESV

The Mighty One, God the Lord, speaks and summons the earth from the rising of the sun to its setting.

Psalm 50:1  NRSV

1 The mighty one, God the Lord, speaks and summons the earth from the rising of the sun to its setting.

Comments

On Monday, January 27, 2020, our Bible Study looked at Psalm 50 and went right by verse one shown above. I was fortunate enough to receive an email from one of our study’s members (thank you Phil) about that verse.  He was emphatic that it contained three Hebrew names for God. Frankly I looked and looked at the verse, especially in the NKJV which we were using and I could not see it, nor in the ESV or the NRSV.

But knowing Phil is a scholar of sorts when it comes to language I decided to look a bit further and at a few more translations. And here are two that back Phil up before we even get to the Hebrew of this verse.

The Supreme God, God, Yahweh, has spoken and summoned the earth, from the rising of the sun to its setting. LEB

The Mighty One, God, the Lord, speaks and summons the earth from the rising of the sun to where it sets. NIV

From these two translations alone we can see this verse has three distinct separate references to God.

If we go to the online interlinear for the OT we are able to easily see three separate references to God just as Phil pointed out El, Elohim, and Yahweh. He quoted Maclaren in his email who said The psalm begins with a majestic heaping together of the Divine names, as if a herald were proclaiming the style and titles of a mighty king at the opening of a solemn assize…. Each name has its own force of meaning. El speaks of God as mighty; Elohim, as the object of religious fear; Jehovah, as the self-existent and covenant God. (BTW assize is a judicial inquest, or the verdict of the jurors involved.)

Phil also added that Spurgeon preached and entire sermon on one verse (v15) calling it Robinson Crusoe’s Text. He told how Defoe’s hero, dying of illness, and faced with the knowledge of his guilt from past sins, turns to God and opens the Bible he had found in his trunk, and “lights upon this passage Call upon Me in the day of trouble; I will deliver you, and you shall glorify Me. Apparently that night he prayed for the first time in his life, and ever after there was in him a hope in God which marked the birth of the heavenly life.

Now that we know much more about verse one and verse fifteen, let’s take a look at the introductory verses and see how they open up this entire Psalm which clearly speaks of salvation especially in verse five below.

The Mighty One, God the Lord, Has spoken and called the earth From the rising of the sun to its going down.
Out of Zion, the perfection of beauty, God will shine forth.
Our God shall come, and shall not keep silent; A fire shall devour before Him, 
And it shall be very tempestuous all around Him.

He shall call to the heavens from above, And to the earth, that He may judge His people:
“Gather My saints together to Me, Those who have]made a covenant with Me by sacrifice.”
Let the heavens declare His righteousness, For God Himself is Judge.                       Selah

Bottom Line: Be ready and able to listen to others whether it be at a Bible Study or by email or someone simply expressing how a verse makes them feel and why it does if they know why. To hear someone express how a verse touches them or their heart is to reveal the power of God’s word in their life and perhaps in our own if we also simply listen. Phil, thanks for your email, it led me to much more research than I have shared here and I learned much. Thank you again.

RileyD, nwJ

Riley D. Driver – Pastor

Calvary Chapel of Dayton