Philippians 4:6-7

Philippians 4:6-7

6 Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. 7 And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.
Philippians 4:6-7

Here in the final chapter of Philippians Paul makes his final exhortations to the Philippians from verse 4 to verse 9 where we find our verses today and underlined below.

4 Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice! 5 Let your gentleness be evident to all. The Lord is near. 6 Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. 7 And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus. 8 Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things. 9 Whatever you have learned or received or heard from me, or seen in me—put it into practice. And the God of peace will be with you.
Philippians 4:4-9

Paul begins in verse 6 by writing Do not be anxious about anything, but how are we to do that? Paul tells us by writing in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. In other words, no matter the situation, take it to God in prayer and appeals knowing He has heard you. Before that Paul instructs us to Rejoice in the Lord always and then repeats this instruction with emphasis I will say it again: Rejoice!

Following this we have Let your gentleness [forbearance] be evident to all. The Lord is near. Gentleness or forbearance? What is that about? The best way is to look at it as sweet reasonableness or as Ellicott’s Commentary says it

properly denotes a sense of what is seemly, or equitable, as distinct from what is required by strict duty or formal law. Such distinction the world recognises when it speaks of what is enjoined, not so much by duty as by “good taste, or “right feeling,” or (with some peculiarity of application) by “chivalrous” feeling, or the “spirit of a gentleman.” Here it denotes the general sense of what is seemly in a Christian tone of character.

Of course the admonition The Lord is near is to keep one aware the Lord could return any day or one could meet the Lord on any given day. Thus one’s behavior such be such that a person then or now (!) is always prepared to meet their Lord.

So now when we have taken all of our concerns and appeals to God, it is then we can expect the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard our hearts and our minds in Christ Jesus. This peace comes as a result of our faith in Jesus as our Lord and Savior which permits the peace of God to guard our hearts and minds.

In the book of Mark chapter 5, a father learns his daughter has died and he should no longer bother the teacher [Jesus]. He can likely hear the mourners crying and wailing at his home, but he had come to Jesus earlier in great faith believing He could heal his daughter. He did this in the midst of a crowd publicly. The same crowd was going with him, Jesus, and Jesus disciples to his daughter. Then after a delay for Jesus to bless someone else he hears his daughter has died. Now, still in the midst of the crowd he may have been in turmoil or simply continuing in his faith Jesus could bring his daughter back. We are not told, but Jesus gives him the peace of God guarding his heart and mind by saying Don’t be afraid; just believe (v35). We are not told of any doubt by this man as he goes with Jesus to his daughter.

Now for the rest of the story go here and enjoy the rest of the story.